05
Jul
09

Feather Craft Vagabond Part Eleven: Rounding 3rd and heading for home…

Using the great Joe Nuxhall’s phrase, we’re “Rounding 3rd, and heading for home” with the 1955 Feather Craft Vagabond. 

Over the July 4th weekend the decks were finished and some electrical work done.  The decks turned our better than I thought they would.

The Helmsman position.

The Helmsman position.

 

The deck was installed in the passengers compartment.

The deck was installed in the passengers compartment.

As for the electrical system, the spotlight, horn, and navigation lights have also been wired to their respective switches.  The switches were installed on the dash, and the fuse panel installed on a brace hidden under the dash on the port side.
In keeping with the Lounge Lizard cool feel of these craft, I was able to procure a "Jetson Flying Saucer" anchor light for the stern.  Groovy man!

In keeping with the "Lounge Lizard" cool feel of these craft, I was able to procure a "Jetson Flying Saucer" anchor light for the stern. Groovy man!

A wiring harness for the vintage 1956 Johnson RJE-18 C “Javelin” outboard will have to be custom made.  Our Thompson had the wiring harness from the dash Start/Choke controls to the solenoid at the transom, but all of this will be made from scratch this time around.  However, the motor has been mounted and looks pretty swell hanging on the back of this boat!

 

Looking sweet hanging on the transom is my 1956 Johnson Javelin.  Like its sister on our Thompson, this motor was restored inside and out over the winter.  New pistons and rings, gasket set, bearings, seals, and that bronz prop at the bottom was found at a swap meet for 15 bucks. Sweet!

Looking sweet hanging on the transom is my 1956 Johnson Javelin. Like its sister on our Thompson, this motor was restored inside and out over the winter. New pistons and rings, gasket set, bearings, seals, and that bronze prop at the bottom was found at a swap meet for 15 bucks. Sweet!

Nothing can mistaken for the lines of a Feather Craft!  The use of “classic boat designs” from the glory days of boating were transfered into an aluminum vessel.  A sturdy, functional, yet stylish boat.  Many have said we are restoring a piece of art from another era by keeping these old beauties alive and floating.  Maybe, maybe not.  I think so.

The bow shot.  I used,as mentioned earlier posts, a bit of artistic license for the windshield.  The bow light replaced the original, and is a twin to the bow light on our Thompson.  Same is true of the horn which is a vintage Sparton vibrator horn made in Jackson Michigan. A very unique sound...and loud too. The spot light is also a vintage Unity S-6 that was rechromed by Chrome Masters of Nashville, TN.

The bow shot. I used,as mentioned earlier posts, a bit of artistic license for the windshield. The bow light replaced the original, and is a twin to the bow light on our Thompson. Same is true of the horn which is a vintage Sparton vibrator horn made in Jackson Michigan. A very unique sound...and loud too. The spot light is also a vintage Unity S-6 that was rechromed by Chrome Masters of Nashville, TN.

 

Sitting in the sun, she's looking pretty cool.  The trailer is original, made by Piper Brothers.

Sitting in the sun, she's looking pretty cool. The trailer is original, made by Piper Brothers.

Classic lines...indeed.

Classic lines...indeed.

Hopefully, if my jury duty doesn’t get in the way this week, I will be able to get the wiring for the motor done and finish the boat by next weekend.  If I can get a shake down run under our belt this week, I made take her to the AMOCI Super Swap Meet at Constantine, Michigan next weekend.
More to follow.  Stay tuned…
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8 Responses to “Feather Craft Vagabond Part Eleven: Rounding 3rd and heading for home…”


  1. July 5, 2009 at 4:48 pm

    really nice work – tis a shame i have dialup – times out before all the pictures are loaded

    ric

  2. 2 r savage
    July 6, 2009 at 9:17 am

    What a beautiful rig. Nice job! I have a 56 evinrude that I will need to wire from the dash back. I’d be interested to know what I’ll need. Did these motors use a junction box? If so, do you know of source for the box and start choke buttons for the dash? Thanks Rick at savage4@rochester.rr.com.

  3. December 23, 2009 at 11:59 am

    I see that you and your fiend have engines that I have spares of. I have a 1959 lark 35 and a 1956 Javelin 30 the lark has the bottom off but the Johnson is a low hour model. Steve

    • 4 conductorjonz
      December 23, 2009 at 12:18 pm

      They are great motors from a classic era of OMC products. Still reliable if taken care of…and run all day long wide open…purring the whole time. They of course were the top of the line for the years manufactured by each company. Very classy looking too.

      Thanks for checking in!

      Greg

  4. 5 Mickey Collier
    March 23, 2010 at 7:57 pm

    Got to like a man who quotes Joe Nuxhall, who pitched in the Majors at 15 years old.

    I know that you have sold your Feathercraft and I’ve seen the picture of the windshield template. Would you happen to have a paper copy of the template suitable for mailing? Thanks

    Mickey in Hendersonville, Tn.

  5. 7 Aaron
    July 9, 2010 at 2:15 pm

    I have looked at all your post of the feather craft Vagabond restoration. It looks like you did a really nice job on it. Where did you get the brackets for the windshield? I am currently looking at a Vagabond II and if I end up buying it I would love to get some more information from you.

    Aaron


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