Archive for the '1950 Johnson TD20' Category

12
Dec
11

Beyond the Sea…horse!: Outboard motor restoration step by step…Day one!

All to often members of our Antique Outboard Collectors Club seem apprehensive, or at least mystified by all the things that are involved in full outboard restoration.  To fully restore an outboard motor properly you have to be librarian, historian, technology buff, technician, sleuth, wheeler-dealer, mechanic, blacksmith, artiste, body shop tech, electrician, cable rigger, forensics expert (novice), and a host of many more talents come in very handy.

Most of our members are amazing at some or all of these aspects of the hobby.  We have many who are simply amazing in their ability to resurrect the “remains” of an old detachable rowboat motor into an operational museum piece.  Some restore motors for display, and some simply return them to operating condition without all the pretty-business being a concern.  Some of our members also are very particular to purchase for their collection only old motors in amazing original condition.  You’d be amazed how many old survivors are out there hiding in garages and basements.

Either way, AOMC is an amazing array of folks to get hooked up with if you are getting into the hobby or just wish to get your old outboard running again.

I am not by nature a “motor-head”!  However seeing an old motor come back to “like new” condition is an amazing experience.  It is my personal preference not to care much about the cosmetic condition of an old outboard when buying one.  My concern is whether it is complete with all parts, and if now are parts able to be procured?

So with this blog post I hope to be able to take you through the basics of how the restoration process have developed for me and the sequence of events I use.  With that said, there are too many outboard motors to show every little nuance of dis-assembly and repair/restoration in it’s entirety.  Instead we will look at basic steps with accents on parts of the project I get the most questions about.  We will address basics of dis-assembly, parts storage for ease of location, cleaning, paint removal, re-assembly, prepping for primer and paint, priming and painting, and decal-ing using vinyl and water-slide decals and clear coating for their protection.  We also take a look at examination of the motor for repair and creating a checklist to keep us on track throughout the project.  (Authors note: I would add this is the system that works for me.  Everyone has their own system.  I’m no expert…so take what you can from this and use it at your own risk!!!)

The project featured in this series will be an OMC outboard, but one that is slightly irregular from the “modern OMC” of the 50’s when Johnson Evinrude and the “bastard step-child of OMC”…the Gale Div. motors began to be standardized, sharing most parts and designs.  This “standardization” began in the mid 1950’s, and parts are still readily available for most of those motors.  Fortunately, some of our AOMC members have started “Cottage industries” supplying parts for some of the outboard of earlier vintage with hard to find parts.

Lets take a quick look at some vintage OMC-style motors.

This 1937 Johnson PO is a motor that was fairly simple and reliable. The basic design was spread out both pre and post-war under different designation and variations.

The PO was around many years before and following WWII.  This motor chimed in with a “whopping” 22HP.  The design had deviation, but largely all that changed was the color.

This is a late 40's Johnson TD-20. The basic power-head design again was used pre-war and post-war. The designs were likely held over owing to manufacturing being for war production, therefore not allowing many new advancements in outboard motor technology...a luxury.

This is a 1954 Johnson RDE-16. This motor design first made its appearance in 1951 as an RD-10, and the basic design of the power-head would remain a staple of the OMC design for many years. With increases in horsepower using advances in piston size, crankshaft and carburetion, these motors reached 40hp by 1960. This particular motor was the first year the "Big Twin" was available with electric starting!!

Our "Chief of the Boat" Remy Marco Jones enjoying the quiet advances of the OMC "Super Silent" exhaust leg on a 1959 Evinrude 35hp Lark!

While we now have a basis on the OMC design, our motor is a “transitional motor” in that it has a non-standard carburetor and lower unit, but does have the “universal magneto ignition” that survived for decades on many, many OMC models!  Our project is a 1951 Johnson QD-12 rated at 10hp at 4000 rpm.  She will, when finished, be the primary power for our 1948 galvanized steel Star Tank & Boat Company rowboat.  In fact this motor is ideal for our little vessel to push us leisurely along for a relaxing trip on protect waterways.

Now without further adieu…here is our specimen!

Looking rather worn, this outboard is in fact in pretty good shape at first look. We'll see how she looks after further triage.

The hood on the early "QD" series was very cool and streamlined! The one on our motor was cracked on the port side, so a replacement was found at a swap meet for 10 bucks. (Pictured here.) However, it was also a pain in the rear since it took almost one dozen screws to hold it on the motor. The later easy-flip open hoods were much easier to deal with...especially at sea! Believe me I know!!

Upon examination of this photo you can see the throttle is more crude than the well known twist-grip throttle that came later. This motor has a synchronized spark advance and carburetor controlled by the sliding lever under the pull start.

The first sign of potential trouble shown by way of damage that has broken through the casting of the exhaust housing on the leg of the motor. This would take a fairly serious impact to create such damage.

The next sign of potential problems is the cowl (hood) bracket on the port side is also cracked and welded back into place. This would indicate to me that this motor has had a collision somewhere in its long life. This would fall in-line with the other damage found above. Outboard battle scars!

Something seen less often is inflicted by dealers who sold these motors, or owner who had to have the most latest-greatest motor. This fuel connector shows the original Sea-mist Green paint. BUT...look at the next photo!

The throttle lever has Sea-mist Green...but the body and the flywheel have shades of the later Sea-horse Green. Sometimes dealers or owners would "update" the color of "last years model" to move it out of inventory when the color change with a model year. The dilemma now is paint as manufactured or as found? For me it is a no-brainer. But I'm not saying which way we'll go with the project yet!

Using a flywheel puller from the local auto parts store, and three grade 8 hardened bolts, the flywheel must be removed to get to the magneto ignition. This can require considerable force to break the flywheel free from the crankshaft. An occasional "whack" with a rubber mallet on the side of the flywheel while under pressure can assist in this operation. NEVER...NEVER smack the flywheel on the top or bottom sides...as this could damage the crank or bearings!

The magneto has been update somewhere along the way. New coils would point to this. The original OMC coils of this era ALWAYS crack and fail and require replacement. These coils are readily available. at any OMC Dealer.

With the cylinder head removed, the pistons seem to be in pretty good shape. There is less carbon build-up than I thought a motor of this vintage would have. This again would bear out the initial thought that this motor has had little run time. The cylinders show little wear and no serious scoring or scuffing.

This view of the power-head shows the handy-dandy shift handle sticking out in front of the motor. This is very handy and a great feature on these older "QD" motors. However, to remove the power-head, the shift linkage must be removed.

After removing the power-head and other parts, the steering shaft is ready for disassembly for ease of cleaning and eventual cosmetic work.

This prop shaft has so much twine wrapped around the shaft, it has gotten between the rubber seal and the brass casing and actually caused the brass to bend out.

Fortunately the prop shaft was not ruined by being groove from the fishing line. The seal will be replaced anyway, but it is amazing the force that has been put on the seal!

Fishing line is a death knell for lower unit seals.

This motor has probably been used, per manufactures directions, with 30wt motor oil mixed into the gasoline. The carbon build up in the exhaust side is evident.

So after Day One, we have a pretty good grasp of what service will be performed on out motor. Now it is time to clean up parts and strip all the old paint off, We'll save that for Day Two!

So after 3 1/2 hours of work the motor has been disassembled and placed in storage containers for safe-keeping until Day Two when cleaning of each part, nut, bolt, screw, and all paint will be removed after degreasing.

Hope you’ll check back in with part 2 here: Beyond the Sea…horse!: Outboard motor restoration step by step…Day Two.

Greg

04
Dec
11

Rhythm is Our Business…Business is doing swell: Captain Jones Vintage Outboard Restoration

Since January 2011 I  have been given the opportunity by three young men from Ramsey Brothers Restorations to move my outboard motor restoration shop into their facility.  The new location would offer me more room than my garage, a pain tbooth, and a large bay with an electric crane with which I could lift big outboards without breaking my back.  Not that I panned to go into business.  It is a hobby for me, but now a self sustaining hobby.  I even started a website at restoredoutboard.com.  Please check it out.  There are photos and info about work being done in the facility.

Big motor, big crane.

12 x 12 paint booth

So now as word has spread that there is a guy who works on old outboard motors as a hobby, many folks with vintage boats have begun to show up for help with their old outboard motors.  Most require a simple tune up, some a major overhaul.  Where is this going lead?  I just don’t know.  But in between working on helping others get their motors going, I have gotten to restore several for myself.  Here’s a few from the months past.

One of the first motors to be restored in my new digs was this 1937 Johnson PO-37 was purchased for 50 bucks on E bay. It was totally locked up...but...

After buying this 1937 Johnson PO-37 22hp outboard on E bay for 50 bucks, I spent twice that to drive from Toledo to Erie, PA to pick it up.  She was tied up and not serviceable.  I wasn’t sure she would be more than just a showpiece for my office at the new shop.  But after my friend Scott Parish came to lend a hand, we were able to use heat and penetrating oil to get her freed up.  We took the block down and everything inside was like new.  She did have a cracked cylinder, but another AOMC member found out I needed a good cylinder and sent me four of them to choose from.  A complete gasket set was purchased and she was rebuilt and repainted.  I still love to just see her on her stand when I walk in my office.  She looks so majestic.  OH!  Yes she does run now!!

After a bit of elbow grease and a full mechanical rebuild, including new piston rings, gaskets and seals and the cosmetic restoration, this old Sea Horse is ready to go for another 70+ years!!

I had the chance to do a little 3hp outboard for a customers grandson.  Very satisfying to see the results below.

This little 1953 Johnson JW 3hp motor was to be used as the first motor for a customers grandson.

Grandfather and Grandson with their restored outboard motor

Perhaps the best part of restoring vintage outboards is summed up in this photo.  A young man getting his rite of passage into freedom and responsibility.

The new Captain with his trusty little Johnson on the maiden voyage for a lifetime of memories.

Ironically, one of the very first jobs I was contracted to do was for a man who was in the Ramsey’s shop the day they met with me to test my interest in partnering with them.  This guy had a rather scrubby little Thompson lapstrake runabout he wanted to use on a no-wake-lake/electric only…no gas motors lake he lived on.  In fact this is a housing development built around and old quarry.  The fellow wanted something more vintage and unique than a pontoon, the prevailing vessel on his lake.  So the Ramsey’s were discussing the project while I stood by quietly.  As I listened…horror or horrors this guy aimed to put a little electric outboard motor on the back of his cute little Thompson.  It was more than I could bear the thought of!!
So being the quiet shy type, I blurted out…”You’re kidding!  why the hell would you do that?  It’ll look stupid!”
Following the eternal deafening silence of me breaking into the Ramsey’s sales pitch…all eyes on me know…me looking for a boat to crawl under…this fellow asked what I thought he should do.
I meekly said ” Well I dunno, but I’d be damned if i’d put some silly looking electric thing on the back of this boat.  Why don’t you gut an old Big Twin and stick an electric golf cart motor under the hood?”  Everyone looked at each other and then back at me.  The guy said “Can you do that?”
“I dunno” says I.
“Well get me some numbers and let me know!” says he!
After conferring with my friend Scott of Fort Wayne again, we both did research and found such things had been done before.  We discussed it over several months.  I had junk parts that were not worthy of a gasoline motor laying around.  So we set out to built an electric motor that was period correct for his boat.  So here tis!

Looks like a big twin on the outside...BUT...

So this was my first foray into vintage outboard restoration.  Making a vintage outboard modern.  Ugh!  Not exactly what I’d hoped for as a vintage outboard job.

Looks like a big twin on the outside...BUT...

So since moving into the new shop and having adequate shop facilities to perform almost any task from major and complete mechanical and cosmetic restorations to simple tune ups on vintage outboard motors, here are a few more pics for your review.

A sea of Johnson Holiday Bronze from 1956 and 1957.

Happy Customer Steve Shaltry with his '56 Johnson Javelin and a matching 7.5hp

One mans box full of trash...

A couple of neighborhood fellows showed up at the door one day I happened to be around holding this box of “parts”!  They offered them to me after finding them in a basement they were cleaning out.  I asked how much and they said “Nuthin’!  We knew you were working on motors in here and thought you might be able to use the parts!”

As luck would have it, I began sifting through the box and realized fairly quickly someone had methodically disassembled this Johnson TD-20 and cleaned it.  After two hours of reassembly, she was back in a bucket of water and running again.

Judging by her condition, not a dent in the tank…etc, I would say she was of very low hours, well taken care of, and maintained.  Lots of compression and she runs pretty well!

is another man's outboard motor. This one given to me by some local men who found it in a box while cleaning out a basement!! Yup! It runs again!

We were asked to set up a display at the Toledo Antique and Classic Boat Show this year.  So many lovely boats of every shape and size.  Many of my motors were hung on the runabouts at the show.  What a thrill and honor it is to see your work being displayed!

We were asked to set up a display at the Toledo Antique and Classic Boat Show this year. The two 1956 Johnson 15hp motors were an eye catching before and after display.

This 1955 Johnson RD-17 was converted to electric start and placed on a 1955 Lyman runabout. The boat and motor won a prize in its class!

Yet another 25hp Johnson, this time an earlier RD-16 with Electric start on its new craft.

Steve Shaltry and Sonny Clark brought this Century Imperial Sportsman back from a crumbling hulk. The 1956 Johnson Javelin was repainted by me and Steve did his own mechanical work.

So this is what has been going on to keep me from updating the blog.  My next post I hope to begin a series on how to do a full restoration from start to finish.  All to often I hear people complain about the price of a full mechanical and cosmetic restoration, but if you look at the balance sheet and the reliability of a properly restored motor as compared with a similar motor of comparable horsepower, the $$ is in my favor.  Besides…these motors have real style!

Stay tuned!

Greg

08
Dec
09

I’ll be Sea-ing you: Restoration work on old Seahorses…

Since the weather in Northwest Ohio has deteriorated to the point that no work outside on the Alumacraft FDR is possible at this point, other work is able to be completed in the shop.  Work on various old outboard motors that needed complete restoration.    

The first is a wonderful old 1949 Johnson TD-20 that was sent my way by the local marina who was asked to take it on trade in.  They of course laughed at the poor guy…and instead told him to call me.  I went to see the motor and it was not only not running, but was seized up.  The tank on the top of the motor was badly dented, and the lower shroud was torn.  They guy wanted 40.00 for this thing to cover his costs of a new recoil he’d just had replaced.  We “dickered” on price a bit and settled on…uh…40 bucks!     

Okay!  It’s a 30 dollar motor at the average swap meet, but oh well!    

Auto body filler is applied to the tank in several layers.

The tank will need to be sanded, filler applied and sanded several times for a smooth finished tank.

After the auto body filler is applied, sanding until the entire tank is smooth will be required.

After applying self-etching primer and Johnson Sea-Mist Green paint from NY Marine, as well as their decals, the motor looks like new.

This little beauty is ready for service. The motor is a non-shift type. It runs in ONE DIRECTION! To go in reverse, you must turn the motor 180 degrees. She looks great in the sun. The decals set is available at nymarine.ca.

Next up was a 1950 Johnson 10hp QD-11 outboard.  This was one of the first full shift versions that came from the OMC Family.  It has forward-neutral-reverse.    

This old Seahorse was purchased on Craigslist for 15 bucks from a local family here in Toledo that does restorations on boats.  They had bought this old thing hoping to restore it…or at least get it running.  The project ran out of steam though.    

Upon inspection the motor was in sad shape.    

Mice had made a condo out of the underside of the cowling. They spent their time sleeping and peeing all over the motor block and exhaust leg. YUCK!

The mouse urine really does a nice job of eating the aluminum.

Following disassembly of the motor, the power-head was soda blasted to get rid of the mouse urine.  Many other parts from under the hood also had to be soda blasted.     

Soda blasting is a very nice way to get rid of dirt and old paint without damaging the aluminum underneath.  In many cases the primer was unscathed, allowing for feathering in new self-etching primer and painting.    

The motor was reassembled after replacement of the water pump impeller and rebuilding the lower unit with new seals.The cowlings were also riddled with mouse urine. I ended up buying a new set off Ebay. They were sand-blasted and primed and painted Johnson Sea-Mist Green

After sand blasting the cowling was primed and painted.

After reassembly and re-working the ignition...paint and decals were applied and she's ready for action!

I've always thought this was a very sexy looking outboard form the Johnson Family!

Next came another Seahorse in the form of trade for services rendered.    

A friend of mine had his grandfather’s 1954 Johnson CD-11 5.5 hp with the original pressure tank, but it was not running.  He had another Johnson CD he was going to use for parts…but the project hadn’t gotten off the ground yet.    

He asked if I would look over the motor and get it running in trade for the parts I could salvage from the second motor.  SURE!    

As luck would have it, his granddad’s motor was in great shape and just needed a tune-up.  The old OMC coils form the 1950’s always crack and make running an impossibility, rebuilding the ignition, installing the new water pump impeller, and rebuilding the lower unit was all that was needed.  This little motor was humming in no time.    

Now the questions of what to do with the junk-pile that was bestowed upon me for my efforts.     

You guessed it!  When in doubt…RESTORE IT!    

The motor was completely stored away in the clamshell hood.  The motor had thrown the #2 connecting rod, for which the “CD Series” is notorious.  I visited the local scrap yard and found a new power-head for this motor.  Swapped parts from one motor block to the other since they are slightly different from year to year, and then the usual rebuild of the ignition, water pump and lower unit.    

The odd thing about this motor was cosmetic.  It was painted 1954 Seahorse Green!  I started to noticed red showing in areas as I tore the exhaust leg apart.  Then a light came on in my head.  The cowling had the oval Seahorse medallion on it.  That meant this couldn’t be a 1954 or 1955 “CD”.  Turns out is was a 1958 CD-15 according to the tag.  I started to assume it had parts swapped around over the years…but no dice.  As I sanded the parts, this motor had obviously been repainted, beautifully, with Seahorse green!    

In an effort to take the motor back to its roots, it was restored in 1958 colors.    

1958 CD-15 Johnson 5.5.Seahorse in classic Holiday Bronze, Cream, and gold lettering.

The 1959 Seahorse medallion was all there, but cracked! I glued it back together with thin viscocity "CA" glue. then it was sanded with 600 grit wet/dry paper and buffed out with Novus plastic polish. The cracks are hardly noticeable!

The next Seahorse came in a very odd and roundabout way.  Here is the story!    

I watch Craigslist for old outboards on occassion.  I saw an old 5 hp Firestone that looked to be a good prospect for restoration.  After 3 weeks it was still listed, so I called the guy.  He stated he’d just sold that motor that afternoon…but had another if I was interested.  He said it was a Martin.    

I know nothing of Martin motors, but thought I would check it out for some of the Martin Motor fans in AMOCI.    

Upon arriving at the guys house, he greeted me and showed me the Martin hanging on the back of his landscape trailer.  It was missing a lot of parts!  I asked how much.  He said “40 dollars”.    

I said “It’s missing the tiller, lower shrouds, the fuel sight glass was broken, and all the carb controls are gone.  I’ll give you 20 bucks.”  

“No way!  I’ll sell it on-line before I’d sell it that cheap!”  he said angrily.    

“Fine…I understand!” I replied.  And as I got to my truck, the guy shouts…”I will take 25 for it though!”    

So I shelled out 5 EXTRA bucks of “extortion money” for the guy without any ideal what was awaiting me.    

I went home and posted on the AMOCI forum asking for guidance as to what this Martin 200 outboard was.  Again…I have no idea at this point!    

I never got a repsonse to the thread I’d started, but I got inundated with PM’s and e-mails.  Obviously…this motor was of interest!    

While a beautiful motor, with potential...it was too much for me to spend time on.

 

Too many missing and high valued parts made this restoration a project for someone who loved Martin Motors.

 A friend of mine from Indianapolis sent an e-mail warning me to watch for “vultures” and he’d sold his similar motor for 1600 bucks last year.    

HOLY CRAP!    

I ended up getting a nice PM from a very nice member of the AMOCI group who was interested, and had a 1957 Johnson Javelin if I was interested.  We spoke on the phone and everything felt right about this deal!    

I also got many offers for cash, but my interest lie in finding the right home for the motor, and maybe something in return to work on restoring for myself.  One guy who kept expressing interest…a little too much maybe…and a little to forceably…was eleminated fairly quickly.    Others were very gracious, but I kept thinking about this guy in Mansfield, Ohio.

After becoming irritated by all the traffic this thing was drawing, I called the fellow with the ’57 Javelin and told him I was on my way to Mansfield to do the deal.    

I arrived and he had a 3-ring binder with the parts manual for the ’57 Javelin (Two copies…one for inside…one for outside.) waiting for me.  He also ran copies of the parts book for the 1957 35hp Evinrude I mentioned in our conversation.  We went to his workshop…where he had two ’57 Javelin’s waiting.  He compression tested the motors for me, let me cherry pick the chrome for the hood from both ’57 Javelins he’d pulled for me.  He also included with the deal the all-elusive cables, solenoid box, throttle, and motor wiring harness…and a 6 gallon pressure tank.    

We talked a while and drank a soda.  I got the Martin out of my truck, and presented it to him.  He seemed happy.  I was happy!  Then I mentioned that the recoil cover for my ’56 Johnson Javelin was broken.  He went over to a series of drawers and pulled one out and threw it in to the deal.    

What a grand experience.  He was just a great host!    A gentleman!  And pretty typical of the guys in AMOCI! 

So the next Seahorse for restoration is a 1957 Johnson Javelin.    

Here she is in all her glory. Actually...in very good shape for a 52 year old motor! I got to pick the best chrome for my cowling, but it will still need to be re-chromed at some point for the restoration process.

This motor is almost ready for action, given her condition!

The faceplate and medallion are in pretty good shape too!

Upon pulling the head on the block, I am almost certain this motor is very low hours, and has seen little use period.  The paint is in good shape with the exception of the lower unit.  I will likely do a complete tune up and cosmetic rebuild, but the rest of the motor appears to be in too good of shape to mess with.    

Aside from these old Seahorses, I also have a Firestone 3.6hp to work on and am in the process of restoring a 1949 5hp Gamble’s Hiawatha that will be featured in a latter blog.    

Thanks for dropping in, and have a great holiday season!

05
Nov
09

The Autumn Leaves: Boating off the water…

As the old song says…”The Autumn Leaves….drift by my window…”.  Not only have they drifted, but they have landed and are at the curb waiting for pickup.

In the meantime, I’ve been spending more time practicing my trombone in the evening, and more time in the workshop working on all things boat related.  I have even made a list as to what I need to achieve before next boating season.  IE; Fix and restore 1958 Johnson CD-15 5hp, 1957 Evinrude 35hp, 1950 Johnson QD-11 (Under Way), 1950 TD-20 (completed), 1948 Gambles Hiawatha 5hp, and a 195? Firestone 3.6hp.  Also on the agenda is stripping the inside of the 1949 Thompson and getting new varnish inside her passenger area.  After all this is done, work can begin on the 1959 Alumacraft.

As mentioned, I have finished a nice little 1950 TD-20 Johnson 5hp outboard.  It came to me in a strange way.  A fellow walks in a local marine dealer…no this is not a joke, as there is no priest or rabbi involved…and wanted to trade this poor old thing in for a new motor.  He’d had the recoil replaced, and the thing would run for a while…then die.

Well the owner of the marina has done some of my motor block work and knows I like old motors.  He didn’t want the thing and gave this fellow my number.  The guy calls me up and asks me to come look at it.

Well I go to this fellows house…and not only is the motor beat up…it’s seized up.  I chuckled when he told me he just put 40 bucks in the motor for a new recoil.  Clearly this guy was frustrated…really just plain ticked.

“How much will you give me for it?!?!” the guy asked.

“Well…it might sell for 30 bucks at a swap meet in this condition.”

He says “Give me 40 bucks for it so I can recoup what I just put in the recoil, and I’ll let you have.”

Okay…I knew this was a tad high, but the guy seemed nice enough, and I had fallen in love with a TN-27 at Pokagon State Park Lodge.  The motor at least had the possibility of running again at best case, and being a nice non-running relic at worst case.  So I shelled out the 40 clams.  The guy was happy.  I wasn’t sure where I stood on the matter.

So home to tear into this thing.  As usual a consultation on the AMOCI forum was the first step.  A fellow there named Lloyd alerted me to the fact that the primer for the carb has a tendency to leak fuel due to worn out leather washers in the primer pump.  He sold the washers with instructions…so I bought them when we met at the Constantine, MI AMOCI meet.

Well I had a helluva time getting the little brass tube that holds these washer in the primer of the carb out.  Penetrating oil, PB Blaster, WD-40…nothing budged this brass tube in the Tillotson carb primer pump.  Lloyd checked in and assured me it should come right out.  If not he would assist in finding another carburetor body for me.

Now I really am thinking…what fresh hell is this motor!

Finally one day a week or two later, while picking at the tube…with a little heat from a torch and some patience…headway came about….it moved and eventually was free from 50+ years of gum  and varnish.  New leather washers were installed and the carb reassembled.  In the meantime the flywheel was pulled and the ignition cleaned up and reworked.  When I popped the flywheel…miricles of miricles…the pistons also broke free and the motor turned.  Go figure.

I did a bit of work on the lower unit to seal it up with new seals and a fresh load of Lubriplate 105, since this is a non shift outboard.  FORWARD ONLY!  And you better be pointed away from the dock.

After re-assembly, I found the motor ran erratically.  A fuel issue it appeared.  Indeed the cork float was saturated.  The carb was removed again, and the float dipped in Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer left over from the Thompson.  This penetrates into the cork and seals it better than varnish or airplane hot dope.

Reassembled the carb and the motor tuned fine now…except for a few leaks in the fuel tank.

It seems that when the tank was sandblasted by a local shop, they used “a LITTLE too much pressure” and apparently the medium of choice was railroad ballast/stone.  I patched the holes with JB Weld.  then set about filling the dents.

DSC00796

The dents in the tank were filled with light weight body filler.

DSC00798

The entire tank needed body work.

Next came sanding.  LOTS of sanding.  Sanding with a pad sander, then an orbital sander, then by hand.  And just when you think its perfect…sand some more!

DSC00799

Now the tank was ready for a coat of self-etching primer.

After trying some expensive self etching primer from the local paint supply house, I found it did not work well at all.  However, for 9.00 at NAPA, I found Duplicolor Self Etching primer.  This stuff seems to really work.  But we’ll see how it holds up in the water.

Paint was ordered from NY Marine at http://www.nymarine.ca/.  Peter sells paint that is a dead match for all the Johnson, Evinrude, and other popular outboards.  At first the 19.99 for a spray can was hard to swallow, but good things have been said about his paint…so I thought I’d give it a try.  It works very much like lacquer.  Very forgiving and very hard when dried completely.  The color is perfect too.  He also sells decals for this motor, so I ordered those as well.

The last issue with the motor is the recoil.  It has three tiny little springs that keep the pawls extended to grab the recoil when pulled.  Then when the motor is running, these pawls swing in due to centrifugal force.  The problem is…they were all missing.  An article was passed around the AMOCI Forum about making your own rather than buying them…so I did…using a guitar string, a screw with the head cut of and a notch cut down its middle.  The sting is wrapped around the screw…and presto!  Recoil spring!

StarterPawls2

The springs are wrapped around the little poles where the pawls pivot on top of the flywheel.

Next all old flaking paint was sanded or blasted off with a soda blaster.  Then primer and paint…and decals too.

DSC00851

Our little 1950 TD-20 is finished and ready for service. She is pictured hanging here on my 1959 Alumacraft FDR.

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The Helmsman's controls left to right: Stop, Slow, Start, Fast. To go in reverse, turn the entire motor 360 degrees!

To protect the decals, a clear coat of automotive lacquer was applied.  Several coats later, she was shiny and new looking.

This may be a nice little motor for trolling along the Maumee River for a sunset cruise next spring.

Work is underway on the 1950 Johnson QD-11.  These are great little 10hp motors, and a blog with be forth coming on it soon.