Archive for the 'Johnson 5hp' Category

21
Dec
11

Beyond the Sea…horse!: Outboard motor restoration step by step…Day Five!

On Day five, we’re waiting on one piston that needs replacing and new rings, as well as some o-ring seals that are required for the water pump housing, the crankshaft journal bearings, and crankshaft seals.  The piston was ordered from Sea-Way Marine, but turned out the superceded part was not correct for this motor.  The original piston is scratched a bit, but can probably be reused.  However if possible, since the power-head is torn down, I’d just assume replace anything that is remotely questionable.  On this motor, almost every single rubber part was hard as rock!  Al the seals needed replacement to be sure, but even the water tube grommet was hard. (Odd!!)

So while we sit and wait on the mailman to show with the new parts, and the search for a new or used good piston is underway, let’s take a look at decals!

Decals seem to be another of those mystical, and magical thing that really can set a motor apart from the pack.  Remember being a kid and building that prized model car or truck?  Remember putting the finishing touch on?  THE DECALS!  You would soak them in water…waiting for ever, it seemed, for them to be ready to release from the backing paper and placed OH SO GINGERLY on the side of that wonderful model!! But somehow they just didn’t look as perfect as the box the kit came in?  How disappointing!  The “secret” will be shown later in this post!!

For now let’s start with self-sticking decals.  Most of my decals come from Peter McDowell of North York Marine.  His line of products has expanded over the last few years.  He also has made very subtle improvements to some of the decals that make working with them a snap!  Peter also works tirelessly to make the decals as authentic as they can be.  Am I endorsing or promoting his product you ask?  Damned right!  Peter is invaluable as a source for the classic outboard market.  He’s knowledgeable and willing to be helpful by sharing his wisdom.

So here is where we are…a green and silver hood that needs decals.  I should mention that even though this motor was given to me, I was fortunate it was a QD-12.  The decals on this motor are slightly different than the preceding years.  This was very attractive to me for that reason alone!

Here is our hood and our decals. I love that "crazy" Johnson script with the "Sea-Horse 10" logo. Slightly different than previous years!

To keep the decal from sticking entirely so it can be pulled up if need be for repositioning, a spray bottle with a mix of 75% distilled water, 25% alcohol and a DROP of dish soap is used to mist the area where the decal is to be applied.

Once the decal is laid in place and you are happy with it, use a plastic squeegee to squeeze the water from behind the decal. The vinyl decals can be stretched around compound curves somewhat. Make sure there is no grit of dirt on the squeegee as this could scratch the decal when rubbing it into place. To be safe you should actually use the backing paper laid smooth side down and run the squeegee over that so the decal will not be damaged in any way.

In about 15 minutes time, our hood has been decal-ed and is ready for use.

If you remember during a previous post I painted a 1956 Johnson 5.5hp hood with Johnson Cream while I was painting some other parts for our subject motor.  Now we’ll decal that hood with the same type of decals.  In my experience I have found it helpful to trim close along the decal in a straight line so there is nothing to get in the way of positioning the decals correctly.  Also your eyes tend to be accurate within a few degrees when “eyeballing” parallel and perpendicular surfaces.

Decals are paper backed vinyl with a self-adhesive. These masked decals are easy to line up and press into place. BUT! once they are applied, they're stuck! Care must be taken in their application.

PREP...PREP...PREP! Again preparation is everything! Clean all surfaces with denatured alcohol to get rid of any and all dirt, grease, or other filth that may affect adhesion. Make sure that the alcohol is evaporated before applying the decals though...or they may never stick again.

Using a spray bottle to mist a mix of distilled water with a DROP of soap added, and maybe a bit of alcohol, mist the area where the decal will be laid in place. This will allow you to move the decal if you get it mis-aligned.

Here our faceplate has the decal and masking applied.

Once laid in place, squeegee the water from behind the decal and smooth it out to make a permanent stick.

These decals are paper backed and after peeling the backing paper you are left with a mask over the printing that allows you to lay the decal in position and burnish it down with the squeegee.

This is the finished faceplate.

Our vinyl decals are masked in front and have a paper backing on the back to protect them while being stored. The backing paper must be peeled away to expose the adhesive side of the decal.

The area of the hood that is to be decaled is misted with water to allow repositioning of the decal if needed. With practice, you will get better and better at getting it right the first time!

In this photo and the next, the decal is showing though the paper mask that allows a perfect alignment of all the letters. Imagine if you had to place each letter independent of one-another!!

The Sea-Horse logo is made up of many smaller decals to make the one big logo! I strongly encourage clear coating these decals to avoid damage during use.

After the masking is remove, this is what has been left behind.

This motor is now ready for service. It's sure to be a conversation starter at the launch ramp.

Looks like new!!

So after 15 minutes to a half hour, this is how the decals are applied and look when done.  Tough part is to get things straight, but practice and patience will do wonders in this regard.

There is still one other type of decal to discuss and that is lacquer/water-slide decals.  These decals are printed on a very thin film, usually clear, then printed or silk screened with each color individually.  The more colors…the more fragile the decal can become.  As the layers of ink dry, on some decals up to half-dozen colors, the thickness of the decal is now much more than the original film.  When applying these decals I use fairly warm, not hot, but warm water in a long wallpaper pan.  The warm water softens the decal and its ink somewhat to make it my pliable.  After soaking for 15 seconds at a time, the decal will eventually lift.  Leaving it on the backing paper, it should be positioned in the area where you want it, then carefully slide the paper out from underneath the decal.

This medium sized decal must wrap around the tank on a Firestone motor. It will have to contour to compound curves of the tank. Here it is soaking in warem water and beginning to unroll indicating the decal is almost ready to be removed from the paper...IN PLACE...onto the tank. These decals have at least three colors, so they are fairly thick...and thus can fracture.

If the decal fractures into large pieces, use a spray bottle with slightly soapy water to wet the area around the decal and push everything together very carefully.  If you need to reposition a decal, especially large decals, use the same method and wet the decal before trying to move it.

WRINKLES!!! Arggh!! No big deal really, but to be expected on compound curves.

Okay…so now we have applied and positioned the water-slide decal on the side of the motor.  But, we also have wrinkles in the decal owing to the compound curves of the tank.  How to move forward?  Follow along closely.

First and foremost…WAIT until all the water has dried out under the decal.  I usually wait anywhere from 24hours to several days before proceeding.  However it is imperative not to touch the decal after it has dried as it has now returned to a fairly rigid state owing to the warm waters absence.  Remember the warm water made the decal soft and pliable.  Now it is back to its natural state.  Touching the wrinkle could cause the decal to crack or flake off.

To get the decal to lay down there are many products available from local hobby shops that sell model train, planes, and automobiles.  Products such as Micro-Set from Microscale Industries or Solvaset from Walther’s Hobbies are chemicals that are made to soften the decal and drive air-bubbles out from under the decal, then allowing it to snuggle down to the surface underneath.  These products will cause the decal to wrinkle usually and during this process you absolutely must not touch the decal!  If you do, you run the risk of the decal tearing, stretching, or being torn.  These decal setting solutions will INITIALLY CAUSE WRINKLES…but they should lay back down over several hours.

I find the Walther’s Solvaset to be slower, yet more powerful.  It also take much longer to let the decal lay down.  The Micro-Sol from Microscale seems to do the job fairly fast but if the decal has many layers of ink, it does not penetrate as well as the Solvaset.  With that said, you will develop your own preference over time.

I should also mention that once the decal lays down, if any additional wrinkles or air bubbles are left behind you can prick them with a fresh #11 knife blade and reapply the solution to allow additional setting to occur.  At any rate…several applications are usually necessary anyway to make the decals lay down completely.  Once the decals are set, the are not going to be able to be moved again, so make sure BEFORE applying the solution you are completely happy with the decal placement!!

The final outcome is quite satisfying. This little Firestone is ready for fun again!

So that is a look at the application of decals that are commonly used in our hobby.  As for our subject motor…we spent about 15 minutes putting decals on our hood.  So we’re sitting around 10 1/4 hours of labor to get the old Sea-Horse ready for summer.  Soon the parts will be in-stock now for rebuilding the power head, so in the next post we’ll give the lower leg a final coat of Sea-Mist Green and reassemble our old girl…and hopefully draw this project to a close.

Hope you drop by for a final chapter found here: Beyond the Sea..horse!: Outboard motor restoration step by step…Day Six!

Greg

08
Dec
09

I’ll be Sea-ing you: Restoration work on old Seahorses…

Since the weather in Northwest Ohio has deteriorated to the point that no work outside on the Alumacraft FDR is possible at this point, other work is able to be completed in the shop.  Work on various old outboard motors that needed complete restoration.    

The first is a wonderful old 1949 Johnson TD-20 that was sent my way by the local marina who was asked to take it on trade in.  They of course laughed at the poor guy…and instead told him to call me.  I went to see the motor and it was not only not running, but was seized up.  The tank on the top of the motor was badly dented, and the lower shroud was torn.  They guy wanted 40.00 for this thing to cover his costs of a new recoil he’d just had replaced.  We “dickered” on price a bit and settled on…uh…40 bucks!     

Okay!  It’s a 30 dollar motor at the average swap meet, but oh well!    

Auto body filler is applied to the tank in several layers.

The tank will need to be sanded, filler applied and sanded several times for a smooth finished tank.

After the auto body filler is applied, sanding until the entire tank is smooth will be required.

After applying self-etching primer and Johnson Sea-Mist Green paint from NY Marine, as well as their decals, the motor looks like new.

This little beauty is ready for service. The motor is a non-shift type. It runs in ONE DIRECTION! To go in reverse, you must turn the motor 180 degrees. She looks great in the sun. The decals set is available at nymarine.ca.

Next up was a 1950 Johnson 10hp QD-11 outboard.  This was one of the first full shift versions that came from the OMC Family.  It has forward-neutral-reverse.    

This old Seahorse was purchased on Craigslist for 15 bucks from a local family here in Toledo that does restorations on boats.  They had bought this old thing hoping to restore it…or at least get it running.  The project ran out of steam though.    

Upon inspection the motor was in sad shape.    

Mice had made a condo out of the underside of the cowling. They spent their time sleeping and peeing all over the motor block and exhaust leg. YUCK!

The mouse urine really does a nice job of eating the aluminum.

Following disassembly of the motor, the power-head was soda blasted to get rid of the mouse urine.  Many other parts from under the hood also had to be soda blasted.     

Soda blasting is a very nice way to get rid of dirt and old paint without damaging the aluminum underneath.  In many cases the primer was unscathed, allowing for feathering in new self-etching primer and painting.    

The motor was reassembled after replacement of the water pump impeller and rebuilding the lower unit with new seals.The cowlings were also riddled with mouse urine. I ended up buying a new set off Ebay. They were sand-blasted and primed and painted Johnson Sea-Mist Green

After sand blasting the cowling was primed and painted.

After reassembly and re-working the ignition...paint and decals were applied and she's ready for action!

I've always thought this was a very sexy looking outboard form the Johnson Family!

Next came another Seahorse in the form of trade for services rendered.    

A friend of mine had his grandfather’s 1954 Johnson CD-11 5.5 hp with the original pressure tank, but it was not running.  He had another Johnson CD he was going to use for parts…but the project hadn’t gotten off the ground yet.    

He asked if I would look over the motor and get it running in trade for the parts I could salvage from the second motor.  SURE!    

As luck would have it, his granddad’s motor was in great shape and just needed a tune-up.  The old OMC coils form the 1950’s always crack and make running an impossibility, rebuilding the ignition, installing the new water pump impeller, and rebuilding the lower unit was all that was needed.  This little motor was humming in no time.    

Now the questions of what to do with the junk-pile that was bestowed upon me for my efforts.     

You guessed it!  When in doubt…RESTORE IT!    

The motor was completely stored away in the clamshell hood.  The motor had thrown the #2 connecting rod, for which the “CD Series” is notorious.  I visited the local scrap yard and found a new power-head for this motor.  Swapped parts from one motor block to the other since they are slightly different from year to year, and then the usual rebuild of the ignition, water pump and lower unit.    

The odd thing about this motor was cosmetic.  It was painted 1954 Seahorse Green!  I started to noticed red showing in areas as I tore the exhaust leg apart.  Then a light came on in my head.  The cowling had the oval Seahorse medallion on it.  That meant this couldn’t be a 1954 or 1955 “CD”.  Turns out is was a 1958 CD-15 according to the tag.  I started to assume it had parts swapped around over the years…but no dice.  As I sanded the parts, this motor had obviously been repainted, beautifully, with Seahorse green!    

In an effort to take the motor back to its roots, it was restored in 1958 colors.    

1958 CD-15 Johnson 5.5.Seahorse in classic Holiday Bronze, Cream, and gold lettering.

The 1959 Seahorse medallion was all there, but cracked! I glued it back together with thin viscocity "CA" glue. then it was sanded with 600 grit wet/dry paper and buffed out with Novus plastic polish. The cracks are hardly noticeable!

The next Seahorse came in a very odd and roundabout way.  Here is the story!    

I watch Craigslist for old outboards on occassion.  I saw an old 5 hp Firestone that looked to be a good prospect for restoration.  After 3 weeks it was still listed, so I called the guy.  He stated he’d just sold that motor that afternoon…but had another if I was interested.  He said it was a Martin.    

I know nothing of Martin motors, but thought I would check it out for some of the Martin Motor fans in AMOCI.    

Upon arriving at the guys house, he greeted me and showed me the Martin hanging on the back of his landscape trailer.  It was missing a lot of parts!  I asked how much.  He said “40 dollars”.    

I said “It’s missing the tiller, lower shrouds, the fuel sight glass was broken, and all the carb controls are gone.  I’ll give you 20 bucks.”  

“No way!  I’ll sell it on-line before I’d sell it that cheap!”  he said angrily.    

“Fine…I understand!” I replied.  And as I got to my truck, the guy shouts…”I will take 25 for it though!”    

So I shelled out 5 EXTRA bucks of “extortion money” for the guy without any ideal what was awaiting me.    

I went home and posted on the AMOCI forum asking for guidance as to what this Martin 200 outboard was.  Again…I have no idea at this point!    

I never got a repsonse to the thread I’d started, but I got inundated with PM’s and e-mails.  Obviously…this motor was of interest!    

While a beautiful motor, with potential...it was too much for me to spend time on.

 

Too many missing and high valued parts made this restoration a project for someone who loved Martin Motors.

 A friend of mine from Indianapolis sent an e-mail warning me to watch for “vultures” and he’d sold his similar motor for 1600 bucks last year.    

HOLY CRAP!    

I ended up getting a nice PM from a very nice member of the AMOCI group who was interested, and had a 1957 Johnson Javelin if I was interested.  We spoke on the phone and everything felt right about this deal!    

I also got many offers for cash, but my interest lie in finding the right home for the motor, and maybe something in return to work on restoring for myself.  One guy who kept expressing interest…a little too much maybe…and a little to forceably…was eleminated fairly quickly.    Others were very gracious, but I kept thinking about this guy in Mansfield, Ohio.

After becoming irritated by all the traffic this thing was drawing, I called the fellow with the ’57 Javelin and told him I was on my way to Mansfield to do the deal.    

I arrived and he had a 3-ring binder with the parts manual for the ’57 Javelin (Two copies…one for inside…one for outside.) waiting for me.  He also ran copies of the parts book for the 1957 35hp Evinrude I mentioned in our conversation.  We went to his workshop…where he had two ’57 Javelin’s waiting.  He compression tested the motors for me, let me cherry pick the chrome for the hood from both ’57 Javelins he’d pulled for me.  He also included with the deal the all-elusive cables, solenoid box, throttle, and motor wiring harness…and a 6 gallon pressure tank.    

We talked a while and drank a soda.  I got the Martin out of my truck, and presented it to him.  He seemed happy.  I was happy!  Then I mentioned that the recoil cover for my ’56 Johnson Javelin was broken.  He went over to a series of drawers and pulled one out and threw it in to the deal.    

What a grand experience.  He was just a great host!    A gentleman!  And pretty typical of the guys in AMOCI! 

So the next Seahorse for restoration is a 1957 Johnson Javelin.    

Here she is in all her glory. Actually...in very good shape for a 52 year old motor! I got to pick the best chrome for my cowling, but it will still need to be re-chromed at some point for the restoration process.

This motor is almost ready for action, given her condition!

The faceplate and medallion are in pretty good shape too!

Upon pulling the head on the block, I am almost certain this motor is very low hours, and has seen little use period.  The paint is in good shape with the exception of the lower unit.  I will likely do a complete tune up and cosmetic rebuild, but the rest of the motor appears to be in too good of shape to mess with.    

Aside from these old Seahorses, I also have a Firestone 3.6hp to work on and am in the process of restoring a 1949 5hp Gamble’s Hiawatha that will be featured in a latter blog.    

Thanks for dropping in, and have a great holiday season!

05
Nov
09

The Autumn Leaves: Boating off the water…

As the old song says…”The Autumn Leaves….drift by my window…”.  Not only have they drifted, but they have landed and are at the curb waiting for pickup.

In the meantime, I’ve been spending more time practicing my trombone in the evening, and more time in the workshop working on all things boat related.  I have even made a list as to what I need to achieve before next boating season.  IE; Fix and restore 1958 Johnson CD-15 5hp, 1957 Evinrude 35hp, 1950 Johnson QD-11 (Under Way), 1950 TD-20 (completed), 1948 Gambles Hiawatha 5hp, and a 195? Firestone 3.6hp.  Also on the agenda is stripping the inside of the 1949 Thompson and getting new varnish inside her passenger area.  After all this is done, work can begin on the 1959 Alumacraft.

As mentioned, I have finished a nice little 1950 TD-20 Johnson 5hp outboard.  It came to me in a strange way.  A fellow walks in a local marine dealer…no this is not a joke, as there is no priest or rabbi involved…and wanted to trade this poor old thing in for a new motor.  He’d had the recoil replaced, and the thing would run for a while…then die.

Well the owner of the marina has done some of my motor block work and knows I like old motors.  He didn’t want the thing and gave this fellow my number.  The guy calls me up and asks me to come look at it.

Well I go to this fellows house…and not only is the motor beat up…it’s seized up.  I chuckled when he told me he just put 40 bucks in the motor for a new recoil.  Clearly this guy was frustrated…really just plain ticked.

“How much will you give me for it?!?!” the guy asked.

“Well…it might sell for 30 bucks at a swap meet in this condition.”

He says “Give me 40 bucks for it so I can recoup what I just put in the recoil, and I’ll let you have.”

Okay…I knew this was a tad high, but the guy seemed nice enough, and I had fallen in love with a TN-27 at Pokagon State Park Lodge.  The motor at least had the possibility of running again at best case, and being a nice non-running relic at worst case.  So I shelled out the 40 clams.  The guy was happy.  I wasn’t sure where I stood on the matter.

So home to tear into this thing.  As usual a consultation on the AMOCI forum was the first step.  A fellow there named Lloyd alerted me to the fact that the primer for the carb has a tendency to leak fuel due to worn out leather washers in the primer pump.  He sold the washers with instructions…so I bought them when we met at the Constantine, MI AMOCI meet.

Well I had a helluva time getting the little brass tube that holds these washer in the primer of the carb out.  Penetrating oil, PB Blaster, WD-40…nothing budged this brass tube in the Tillotson carb primer pump.  Lloyd checked in and assured me it should come right out.  If not he would assist in finding another carburetor body for me.

Now I really am thinking…what fresh hell is this motor!

Finally one day a week or two later, while picking at the tube…with a little heat from a torch and some patience…headway came about….it moved and eventually was free from 50+ years of gum  and varnish.  New leather washers were installed and the carb reassembled.  In the meantime the flywheel was pulled and the ignition cleaned up and reworked.  When I popped the flywheel…miricles of miricles…the pistons also broke free and the motor turned.  Go figure.

I did a bit of work on the lower unit to seal it up with new seals and a fresh load of Lubriplate 105, since this is a non shift outboard.  FORWARD ONLY!  And you better be pointed away from the dock.

After re-assembly, I found the motor ran erratically.  A fuel issue it appeared.  Indeed the cork float was saturated.  The carb was removed again, and the float dipped in Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealer left over from the Thompson.  This penetrates into the cork and seals it better than varnish or airplane hot dope.

Reassembled the carb and the motor tuned fine now…except for a few leaks in the fuel tank.

It seems that when the tank was sandblasted by a local shop, they used “a LITTLE too much pressure” and apparently the medium of choice was railroad ballast/stone.  I patched the holes with JB Weld.  then set about filling the dents.

DSC00796

The dents in the tank were filled with light weight body filler.

DSC00798

The entire tank needed body work.

Next came sanding.  LOTS of sanding.  Sanding with a pad sander, then an orbital sander, then by hand.  And just when you think its perfect…sand some more!

DSC00799

Now the tank was ready for a coat of self-etching primer.

After trying some expensive self etching primer from the local paint supply house, I found it did not work well at all.  However, for 9.00 at NAPA, I found Duplicolor Self Etching primer.  This stuff seems to really work.  But we’ll see how it holds up in the water.

Paint was ordered from NY Marine at http://www.nymarine.ca/.  Peter sells paint that is a dead match for all the Johnson, Evinrude, and other popular outboards.  At first the 19.99 for a spray can was hard to swallow, but good things have been said about his paint…so I thought I’d give it a try.  It works very much like lacquer.  Very forgiving and very hard when dried completely.  The color is perfect too.  He also sells decals for this motor, so I ordered those as well.

The last issue with the motor is the recoil.  It has three tiny little springs that keep the pawls extended to grab the recoil when pulled.  Then when the motor is running, these pawls swing in due to centrifugal force.  The problem is…they were all missing.  An article was passed around the AMOCI Forum about making your own rather than buying them…so I did…using a guitar string, a screw with the head cut of and a notch cut down its middle.  The sting is wrapped around the screw…and presto!  Recoil spring!

StarterPawls2

The springs are wrapped around the little poles where the pawls pivot on top of the flywheel.

Next all old flaking paint was sanded or blasted off with a soda blaster.  Then primer and paint…and decals too.

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Our little 1950 TD-20 is finished and ready for service. She is pictured hanging here on my 1959 Alumacraft FDR.

DSC00853

The Helmsman's controls left to right: Stop, Slow, Start, Fast. To go in reverse, turn the entire motor 360 degrees!

To protect the decals, a clear coat of automotive lacquer was applied.  Several coats later, she was shiny and new looking.

This may be a nice little motor for trolling along the Maumee River for a sunset cruise next spring.

Work is underway on the 1950 Johnson QD-11.  These are great little 10hp motors, and a blog with be forth coming on it soon.